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The Department of Homeland Security in the United States has declared the Soros-Funded far left group Antifa a domestic terrorist organization, why does Canada refuse follow their lead?

 

The antifa (/ænˈtiːfə, ˈæntiˌfɑː/)[1] movement is composed of left-wing, autonomous, militant anti-fascist[7] groups and individuals in the United States.[11] The principal feature of antifa groups is their use of direct action,[12] with conflicts occurring both online and in real life.[13] They employ protest tactics including property damage, physical violence, and harassment against those whom they identify as fascist, racist, or on the far-right.

On the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) website, the so-called “anti-fascist” group is described as a “subset anarchist movement” who focus on issues “involving racism, sexism, and anti-semitism,” by inciting violence across the United States.

DHS reports: Self-described Antifa groups have been established across the United States and in several major cities, including New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and San Francisco. A majority of New Jersey-based anarchist groups are affiliated with the Antifa movement and are opposed to fascism, racism, and law enforcement. Antifa groups coordinate regionally and have participated in protests in New York City and Philadelphia. There are three loosely organized chapters in New Jersey, known as the North Jersey Antifa, the South Jersey Antifa, and the Hub City Antifa New Brunswick (Middlesex County).

ANTIFA is very active in Canada and has internet and social media reach in the thousands. They use social media to coordinate their “troops”, brag about beatings on civilians and post pictures of the destruction they cause. If a person doesn’t share their ideology you are branded a NAZI and they will harass and threaten on social media. At rallies they cover their faces and use weapons and mega phones to block, beat, and disperse all those who do not conform to their ideology.

 

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees the freedom of expression, freedom of association, and freedom of peaceful assembly. Throughout our history citizens have used the power of peaceful assembly to voice their opinions on various issues, its our right as Canadians. It is against the law however, to cause a disturbance. Loud fighting, shouting, swearing, chanting, or singing in a public place, as well as annoying or impeding other people in a public place can be punished with six months in prison or a $5000 fine. It is also against the law to be a common nuisance. If you impede people form exercising/enjoying their rights, or endangering the lives, safety or health of the public you are guilty of being a public nuisance and can be punished with up to two years imprisonment.

 

If Canadians have legal guidelines to follow while protesting, why is law enforcement not doing anything about ANTIFA? In 2012 during the Quebec student protests and during the 2010, G20 protests in Toronto, many protestors wore masks or scarves to cover their faces. In response the Canadian Government passed Bill C-309, making it illegal to cover one’s face during unlawful assembly, with a punishment of up to 5 years imprisonment.  If during a riot, the penalty goes up to 10 years. ANTIFA are clearly in violation of the law whenever they assemble and yet honest, average citizens are placed at risk by the inaction of law enforcement. And all the main stream media can focus on is the mysterious rise of alt right terrorism, of which I fail to see the difference between the groups.

Why does our liberal government refuse to call out Antifa for what it truly is……a terrorist organization?

Is protecting ANTIFA, an illegal Socialistic/Communist organization that shuts down free speech advantageous to a government whose controversial policies require that the public be kept in check, in a manor that only an illegal organization can?

You be the judge, and when your candidate comes knocking at your door, looking for your vote, be sure and ask them as well.

 

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